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Cajun-Creole
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From Cajun-Creole Country . .

 

Cajun-Creole food is good, hearty fare that you absolutely must try! In it’s evolution over the years, it has luckily been sheltered from the ravages of changing food trends to take center stage among ethnic or regional foods throughout the world.  French in origin, the cuisine was broadened by Indian herbs and cooking methods, fiery Spanish spices and chillies, and Black soul food.  The result is spicy, down-home food with the subtle delicacy of haute cuisine lurking right under the surface.  Maybe you ask, “ What kind of food does a Cajun or Creole eat?”  Well, they answer is “Just about anything that can’t get away.”  In Cajun-Creole country, they live and die by the motto, “Laisse le bon temps rouller,”  or  “ Let the good times roll.”  So we hope you too will let the good times roll at the Cottage Kitchen as you savour some of the exquisite and authentic dishes we offer for your adventure in dinning.  We guarantee they won’t run away!!!!

 

Shrimp Jambalaya

This traditional New Orleans dish, a Cajun speciality, consist of a mixture of cooked-down vegetables and our special, mildly spicy cured sausage, and plump, tender shrimp.  Don’t fear;  this dish has just enough “heat” to let you know you’re eating something unique, but not at a level that will prevent you from enjoying that pleasing sensation in the middle and back of your mouth that will have you coming back for more.

 

Shrimp Creole

Probably one of the most widespread of all the old Creole classics, and rightfully so because it certainly is one of the best.  Our mildly spicy version is a tomato based sauce with a variety of fresh vegetables slowly and carefully cooked-down;  with plump and tender shrimp, served over a bed of steaming rice.

Crab Meat au Gratin

A traditional dish in New Orleans that has never lost its popularity.  This dish is served with a green salad and slices of French bread.

 

Stuffed Crab Lafitte`

Stuffed in their own shells, these beauties are served with a small green salad and slices of French bread.

 

Shrimp Etouffee`

“Etouffee`”  means “smothered.”  In Cajun-Creole cooking, it means cooked covered with liquid; but those are about the only constants.  Recipes vary greatly but you can rest assured our etouffee` is all so wonderful!  Served over steaming rice.

 

Barbecued Shrimp

Around Southern Louisiana, every cook worth his or her salt seemed to have had a recipe for barbecued shrimp. Mine has evolved from all the best.  In case you’re wondering, barbecued shrimp, Louisiana style, never see a grill.  This tasty concoction is based a uniquely different sauce made of real butter, home-made shrimp stock, and enough seasonings to bring tears to the  eyes of mere mortals.  Eat these and you’ll ask yourself again and again, “Why on earth do I keep eating these darn things?”  Served with French bread slices to “sop” the sauce, and plenty of napkins for those not fond of licking their fingers.

 

File` Gumbo

Gumbo is one of the most often-ordered dishes in New Orleans, by both tourists and locals alike.  It is a staple in the Louisiana home,  and now we are happy to share it with you here in the Philippines.

 

About Cajun Blackened Dishes

The first time I was served a blackened dish, I couldn’t help but think the cook fell asleep and burned my food, and expected me to eat it.  After being convinced it wasn’t burnt, and convincing myself to try it, I found it to be wonderfully juicy, tender, and tasty.  Liking it so much, I naturally mastered the process.  Actually, blackening changes the texture of fish an meat, and provides for a building of natural taste that can’t be duplicated any other way.  The real butter and the more than twelve spices I use are key elements in the process.  They allow the blackening to reach it ultimate potential by forming a barrier between the food and the white hot skillet.  The process concentrates the fibbers into a crust and accents the taste.

 

Blackened Red fish

 This now famous dish really needs no introduction.  When we prepare this one, we create so much smoke that we have to turn the smoke alarm off - - but we still sit off the neighbour’s.  Don’t let that “ALARM” you though.  It will taste absolutely great, I tol’ you for true!  Served with baked potato, French fries or steamed rice, mixed vegetables and dinner bread.

 

Blackened Catfish

If you love catfish, you’ll love it blackened even more.  Served with baked potato, French fries or steamed rice, mixed vegetables and dinner bread.

 

Blackened Chicken

Another enormously popular Cajun dish, just as tasty as the fish above.  Served with bake potato, French fries or steamed rice, mixed vegetables and dinner bread.

Blackened Steak

This 200 gram U.S. Rib Eye steak has a taste so exciting and unique you’ll have a party in your mouth.  Better yet, you will not want a steak cooked any other way!  Served with baked potato, French fries or steamed rice, mixed vegetables and dinner bread.

Blackened Blue Marlin

A New Orleans favourite, this wonderful dish will cause you to forsake all your favourite fish dishes!  Served with vegetables, baked potatoes, French fries or steamed rice, and dinner bread.

 

Blackened Hamburger

Pure ground beef, specially seasoned with Cajun spices and cooked using the blackening process.  If you haven’t tried this one yet, you just don’t know what you’re missing.  Served with French fries and cole slaw.

 

Cajun Fried Chicken & Dirty Rice

Cajuns are masters at cooking with chilli peppers, or capsicums, the botanical group to which cayenne peppers belong.  These same hot peppers are used to marinate the chicken for this dish and are made to taste completely different by varying cooking times and temperatures.  Without the modification you would never live through, much less enjoy the taste.  And no, we don’t sweep the rice for “Dirty Rice” off our floor.  This is a mixture of pureed chicken gizzards and livers, sautéed with other Cajun ingredients and cooked into the rice.  Served with mixed vegetables and dinner bread.  

 

Midi song playing : " After The Love Is Gone "

 

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